Articles

Building a martial arts method III

User Rating: / 2
PoorBest 

Building a martial arts method III


-1-

Tai chi strength

People think that tai chi chuan is performed slowly and with all muscles relaxed. Doctors say that it is an exercise that can be beneficial for people who want to improve their health or condition. People wishing to find a sense of well-being and pleasure through relaxing exercises can also find it helpful. This is one of the merits of tai chi chuan.

But that is not all that tai chi chuan can do. In addition to these advantages, it can also help us to acquire effectiveness in martial art, because it enables us to form and develop the specific strength of tai chi.

However, if we look back at the origins of this discipline, we see that the situation is now just the opposite of what it was. Originally tai chi chuan was an effective art of combat, and only later was it discovered to be a good exercise for restoring health and well-being.
This second advantage gained steadily in importance and ended up being the dominant aspect of tai chi chuan – so much so, in fact, that it now overshadows the discipline’s martial origins. Indeed, in most contemporary schools of tai chi chuan, the original martial aspect has faded and has almost disappeared.

I realize that these statements might clash with the idea that people usually have of tai chi chuan.

-2-

Tui shou in tai chi chuan

Some people say that they do tai chi chuan marcial, because they practice tui shou (pushing hands) – an interesting and effective exercise for developing certain aspects of combat. But what exactly is the usefulness of tui shou? What aim is sought in this training?

In contact combat, there inevitably comes a moment when the two adversaries’ arms cross. Even if you prefer to attack your opponent from a distance, your arm will cross his the instant that you hit him.Whatever your size and reach, you cannot touch your opponent without passing through the zone where he can cross his arm with yours. This is a crucial moment in combat.

When I think about those first generations of tai chi Yang practitioners, I wonder how they practiced tui shou?
If Yang Luchan and his descendents gained a reputation during a period of great social unrest in China, it has to be because they exhibited outstanding capacities in combat. During the Opium War (1839-42), China embarked on a long period of serious social upheaval. As we know from the Boxer rebellions, a large number of martial artists participated in these historical uprisings. So it could not have been as a practice for health and well-being that tai chi chuan gained its fame. It stood out because of its effectiveness in combat. If people practiced tui shou during that period, it must have been directly related to the practice of combat. I imagine that for the practitioners of that time, there was no sense in excelling in tui shou unless doing so enabled them to develop fighting skills.

The situation is different today.

There are experts in tai chi chuan who excel in tui shou and give spectacular demonstrations. Tui shou exercises are very productive and we can benefit from them immensely. But I have never met a tui shou expert in tai chi chuan capable of demonstrating the same qualities in actual contact combat. If any of them were good at sparring, it was almost always because they had practiced other forms of combat and had integrated them into their tai chi chuan. I’m not saying that they don’t exist, but simply that I have never found an expert formed solely in tai chi chuan who was capable of fighting against a boxer.

To be effective in contact combat, you have to develop and perfect subtleties and a particular strength to respond properly at that decisive moment when your arms cross those of your opponent. This is what was originally sought through the practice odf tui shou. If we train with slowness and suppleness, it is in order to acquire the ability to respond to the attacks of a fast, strong opponent. Therefore, in tui shou, just as in practicing the form of tai chi chuan, you are working on acquiring the capacity to deploy strength and speed by performing slow, supple exercises. This practice made it possible to cultivate cutaneous awareness, or the ability to «listen to strength», and later gave rise to a culture of awareness of the opponent’s ki.

Our initial question remains unanswered for the moment: «How can we develop speed through slowness or strength through suppleness?»

But let us continue.

-3-

A question of strength

In martial art as in war, combat requires the use of strength. There is no combat without it, and it must be used with speed. This seems to me as self-evident as saying that fire is hot.
Some might say, "Yes, but in aikido, you don’t use strength to physically dominate your opponent, and the same is true of tai chi chuan, because in the noble martial arts you don’t use strength...".
To which I would reply, "In aikido, you have to learn to master a particular strength in order to annul the effect of your opponent’s power. Since most aikidoka are not capable of doing this, aikido combat often becomes a demonstration between two accomplices. Aiki technique is executed thanks to what is known as transparent power, with which it’s possible to annul your opponent’s strength." It is only with this particular strength that aikido becomes a magnificent martial art.

Yi chuan master Han Xingqiao (1909-2004) says in his book Yi-Chuan xué (The Study of Form-Mind Boxing): "You must transform troubled strength into the total strength generated by integrating the combined power of the entire body". Here, what he calls "troubled" strength is the ordinary power generated by the partial activation of muscles. According to Han Xingqiao, yi chuan teaches you to “mobilize all the muscles, as though the body were wrapped in a single one”.
Whatever the period and culture, and no matter how particular, subtle, brutal, ordinary, transparent or total… combat may be, it is always a question of strength. The only things that vary are the quality, mode of training and the technical concept of strength.

A master once said: “Once it is considered an art, combat cannot be treated like something for idiots. It is subtle and requires a lot of thought together with hard, constant practice. It’s not enough to train any old way. You need intelligence, physical qualities and courage to be able to advance along this solitary path. Even when these conditions are met, it is still not certain that you’ll achieve your aims...”

-4-

Relaxation and strength


The basis for acquiring tai chi chuan strength is learning how to relax the muscles of the whole-body. Relaxation is then the starting point for learning how to marshal the strength of all your muscles – i.e. whole-body strength. Whether working on muscle relaxation or mobilization, the idea is always to do it to a degree beyond the ordinary level. Our capacity for relaxing the muscles mirrors our capacity for marshalling strength.

However, when executing techniques, the muscles are relaxed longer than they are tensed, giving the impression that no muscle strength is being used. You sometimes hear it said that instead of using muscle strength, we use the power of qi (ki). On this point, I prefer the theory of the correlation between qi and muscle strength, which says that with each increase in qi, there is an increase in degree of muscular strength. Whenever we express strength through bodily techniques, no matter how short they are, they are clearly produced by activating the muscles, regardless of our sensations and the subtlety of our movements. What activates the muscles are orders from the brain, and thus the importance of yi (intention).

If we practice tai chi chuan with relaxed muscles, later on we will have to learn how to form and utilise the specific strength of tai chi. I consider that practicing tai chi chuan with relaxation is appropriate at the beginning of one’s training.
In a way, this type of training corresponds to what we do in kindergarten – in a good kindergarten, that is. But later on, school children grow and can go on to university, where they must continue to progress and learn how to use their abilities at a higher level. That is, they must become able to generate great strength, the specific strength of tai chi.  So there is consistency in this progress from the beginning to the most advanced level – with all my respect for those who are in the earliest phases of their training.

However, as we saw earlier, even if one stays at the elementary level, it is possible to improve one’s condition and profit a great deal from this discipline. Everyone is free to stay at this level of practice if they feel it is good for them.
No-one is obliged to move on to building strength. It is simply a matter of choice. But for those who do choose to move forward in this direction, the method to be applied is difficult. This is where the problem lies.
So we come back to our initial question: how can we build up our speed and strength through slow, relaxed training?

To be continued...

 

Articles - Essays by Kenji Tokitsu

Building a martial arts method II

User Rating: / 2
PoorBest 

 

Building a martial arts method II

-1-


Let’s take an example: in order to develop and enhance the power of their fist strikes, people usually train using a punching bag, lifing weights, using elastic strips, etc. Through such training, we mainly exercise the muscles that appear to be directly involved in punching movements, so we think that these are the logical exercises to perform.

But the ancients thought otherwise:
« In order to build great strength in the fist, what must be strengthened is not the part closest to the hand, but the part furthest away from it. ». That is, the power of the hand must be furnished from the spine, harnessing the power arising from the feet, the legs, the buttocks…


The methods of tai chi chuan and zhan zhuang (ritsu-zen) belong to this register.


If we watch a practitioner of these methods standing apparently still and especially not moving his arms, we will see, particularly if he is an expert, that he is capable of deploying astonishing strength. This is because he is capable of marshalling diverse strengths originating in the areas furthest from his hands and arms – i.e., areas such as the back, the legs, etc.

This way of activating the muscles is distinct from what we are used to conceiving according to sports logic.
So it is not because the expert is able to deploy the power of ki (qi), but because he knows how to harness the strength of a series of muscles not often used in normal practice. According to kiko theory, when your ki increases, your muscular strength increases as well, and it is this activation of the muscles that corresponds to an activation of ki.

To achieve this level, how must we train? This will be one of the main themes of this series of essays.

-2-

 

What path, what method to choose?


In my latest book, I wrote the following words:
«The form of tai chi chuan that I now practice has evolved compared to the tai chi that I learned. When I compare the two, I feel no regrets.
For better or worse, so far I have had no reason to alter my basic point of view. However, I am always willing to re-examine it and to modify my practice if I find a better method, which to me would be a pleasure. »

With these statements, I have made clear my position regarding the study and practice of the "method" of tai chi chuan. Accordingly, there is no sense in asking me what school or current I belong to. I practice my own method of tai chi chuan and consider it related to all the forms of practice that I have known.

Nor is it necessary to repeat what I have already written in the aforementioned book. I shall simply develop a few related reflexions to further clarify matters.

In the book, I insisted on the importance of building the strength that is apparently absent in most current forms of tai chi chuan.

-3-

 

What does being "authentic" mean?



Tai chi chuan can be translated as "boxing (chuan) according to the principle of tai chi (dynamic integration of the two complementary elements, yin and yang)".

I feel that this is the best possible definition of tai chi chuan.


If you are concerned about the authenticity of the tai chi chuan that you practice, I think the most logical thing to do would be to refer to this definition rather than to your belonging to a particular school or your links to a master whom you have seen once, twice or even on a regular basis.

For those who seek the true meaning of tai chi, the important thing should be the degree to which they are enabled to fulfil the principle of tai chi, rather than their belonging to a certain group or institution.

What truly matters is what you manage to do with your capacities thanks to the method that you practice. The only thing that really counts is the quality of what you do and your level.

To my way of thinking, the value of a method is expressed through the quality of its practitioners and through the prospects that it opens up to them. Not even an Olympic champion can jump 10 metres in a single leap, but if there is a ladder, each of us can climb to the top, rung by rung. The equivalent of the ladder is the method. And thus the proverb: "Even a road to a thousand places begins with a single step".

If we examine the different modern forms of tai chi, comparing them to the ancient form, we will see that they have all incorporated a large number of modifications. But I feel justified in saying that all the modified techniques and forms become ˝authentic˝ from the moment they are performed according to the principle of tai chi. The different schools of tai chi chuan have developed in this way.

We can compare and examine the different modern forms of tai chi in relation to tai chi Chen or Chen-syle boxing. In doing so, we will see both similarities and differences, since the ancient form has had numerous modifications introduced to it over the years.

So I repeat, all modified forms and techniques are authentic insofar as they are executed according to the principle of tai chi. These modifications are what have given rise to the different schools of tai chi chuan.

Let us look at this a little more closely.

-4-

Deformation or creation?


As we saw in my book, Yang Luchan (1799-1872) developed what is known as tai chi Yang based on the Chen boxing that he had learned from Chen Changxing (1771-1853). Yang reorganized Chen boxing according to a principle that would later become the principle of tai chi. The point is that he modified Chen boxing.
In fact, at the time, Chen boxing masters all felt that Yang-style tai chi was nothing more than a deformation of their boxing. What would they think of it today?

All authenticity is created thanks to a deformation, because in this particular case, what we must understand is that the word deformation means "to change the form while maintaining the principle". So according to this logic, aren’t almost all modern so-called "authentic" forms of tai chi chuan the result of such deformations?

Wu Yuxiang (1812-1880), the founder of Wu-style tai chi chuan, was the first disciple of Yang Luchan. Tai chi Yang and tai chi Wu are two different schools that share similarities.

Wu Yuxiang was very close to his master, to such an extent that, as we have seen, it was thanks to him that the tai chi of Yang Luchan became known in Peking and later in the rest of the world. I imagine that the two masters were very close. So why would Wu Yuxiang, once so close to his master, finally distance himself from him? Why would he end up founding his own school instead of continuing that of his master?

If he were alive today, he could declare himself the authentic representative of the Yang school, because he was the founder’s first and closest disciple.
What he did, however, was found his own school. Now then, who today could say that the Wu school is a deformation of Yang?

I think that if Wu Yuxiang felt it necessary to modify what Yang Luchan had taught him, it must be because he had personal reasons for doing so, according to his way of understanding and practicing the principle of tai chi. It can’t have been out of mere caprice that the changes were made, but out of the need to apply this principle in his own way.

Wu Yuxiang might have thought something like this: "I have to do it this way and not that, because this is how I understand the principle." Given their respective ages, Wu must have incorporated his modifications during the lifetime of his master.

Isn’t that freedom in the true sense of the word?

This fact makes me realize to what extent we have become prisoners in a system in the name of "authentic practice".
A precursor is like a lone navigator out on the ocean who must follow only his own rational judgement bolstered by the strength of his courage for as long as he can’t see the horizon. Such strength is far from forming part of people who only follow a path already laid down by an institution. Such people carry on thanks to signposts put up by others, whereas the lone navigator forges ahead charting his own course and establishing his own rules.

I think that there can exist various "authentic" forms of tai chi as long as they apply the true principle of tai chi. In this view, certain technical passages may differ from one "authentic" school of tai chi chuan to another, but such differences should not pose a problem for people practicing the discipline according to its fundamental principle. It will clearly pose major problems, however, for those who practice tai chi strictly according to the norms of an institution.

This seems to be the predominant tendency today in the practice of tai chi chuan, as in all other activities.

-5-

Institution or principle – which to follow ?


All institutions tend to use power to impose their criteria.
This is where we can find problems, because their aim is not to develop a principle but merely to see that it is perpetuated.

For example, we can compare certain sequences of tai chi Chen and tai chi Yang.
The jumping kicks of the Chen school are executed by the Yang school as two successive, separate kicks, with both feet back on the ground between each. A circular jumping kick in Chen becomes in Yang two kicks while slowly changing direction and placing the foot back on the ground before the second kick.

But even those who have studied these two forms are not necessarily able to compare them, because if they have studied and practiced them solely according to codes and rules laid down formally and without stepping back to look at them objectively, they cannot examine them with an analytical eye.

To people who have learned to step back and regard them objectively, the change between the first and second schools is quite visible, because it follows a certain "logic" that can be interpreted in one of two ways: "The Yang school is an adaptation made to accommodate people who are less dynamic", or else, "The Yang school is the result of a new technical series".

To people lacking this knowledge and insight, the two forms are simply different.

To people who are able to compare the two forms objectively, it is impossible to claim that the Yang school is false compared to tai chi Chen; the only thing they can say is that tai chi Yang has a different technical value.

To the extent that the principle of tai chi is applied in the change, each new form can become an authentic tai chi. I think this point is polemical due simply to the logic that we normally find – i.e., "if we change an authentic form, it can no longer be authentic and therefore is false".

The fact is that numerous schools and various styles of tai chi chuan seen today have been formed as a result of modifying their original model, and have become authentic to the extent that they apply the principle of tai chi. In a way, I would say that all forms of tai chi are authentic insofar as they have evolved respecting the principle of tai chi.

For the philosophy of tai chi is alive, and therefore mobile and dynamic. Whereas it seems to me that the Western spirit, though claiming to be the paragon of liberty and rationality, is often cloistered within a rigid system of fixed rules.

Many people practice tai chi chuan attaching importance to the standardized form and model or to its technical rules. Very few practice it focusing on the principle that is the very basis of technique. The first are satisfied insofar as they conform to the system of the school they have chosen, while the second are satisfied insofar as they comprehend the multiplicity of technical possibilities arising from a principle.

Those who attach importance to the technical shell are interested in rules, and those who seek what’s esential concern themselves with the principle, which is what gives rise to creation.

To be continued...

Articles - Essays by Kenji Tokitsu

Building a martial arts method I

User Rating: / 1
PoorBest 

 

Building a martial arts method


Following the publication of my latest book, Tai-chi-chuan, origine et puissance d'un art martial (version in English forthcoming), I have received numerous queries concerning this practice and have decided to answer them in a series of articles on my website. In fact, I think of them as a kind of introduction to my next book, which will be concerned with the practical matter of how to implement a martial arts method.  
I hope to be able to publish an article each fortnight as of this month.

-1-


The concept of Tai Chi goes beyond Tai Chi Chuan
In my book Tai-chi-chuan, origine et puissance d'un art martial  (Ed. Désiris 2010), I dealt with a number of issues that I find crucial to the practice of this discipline. The work was based on historical research and on my own personal practice.
My reflexions were not so much intellectual in nature as concerned with physical training, because I used to wonder so much whether Tai Chi Chuan was really a martial art.
I felt that if it truly was one, then I would have to gain an understanding of why and how it could be possible to build and develop fast, powerful moves and techniques through slow, supple exercises.
If such an apparently magical method really existed, I needed to be able to understand it in order to practice it. My plan was simple and direct. In the course of my research, I would reject any ideas previously held that couldn’t stand up to the practical test of forming combat capabilities.
I discovered personally that while some experts in Tai Chi Chuan may be very good at tui shou, this didn’t make them automatically capable of handling themselves effectively in karate-style or boxing-style sparring. Since this type of experience failed to convince me, I realized I would have to look further.
In this series of articles to appear on my website, I will outline the second stage of my quest, which will serve as an underlying theme of the book that I expect to publish some time in 2012. At the same time, I will present a number of images illustrating these texts in internet.
Taking up some of the threads running through my latest volume, I shall try to explore the domain of physical training much more generally. This will enable me to avoid repeating what I’ve already explained, particularly as regards historical considerations. I will simply recall certain passages that I consider crucial to my argument. Should any reader wish more information on the subject, I would encourage them to read the book.
The aim of this series of articles is to further my reflections on how to ensure better martial arts practice.

-2-

Let us recall a passage that can be found in the book:
In his work Yi Chuan Xue (Study of Yi Chuan), Han Xingqiao wrote the following:
"In the ancient work Daode jing, we find the following passage: ‘Tai Chi, Origin of the Universe, is divided into the two opposite but complementary elements, yin and yang, which are each divided into four, producing eight phenomena; then into eight times eight, yielding sixty-four phenomena and so on into infinity …’ To us, this statement indicates the orientation of zhan zhuang where you integrate your whole body, which becomes the Tai Chi of primeval chaos. Thus the exercise known as zhan zhuang is based on the principle of Tai Chi...”.
According to Han Xingqiao, the purpose of zhan zhuang, a fundamental exercise in yi-chuan, is to embody the principle of Tai Chi...
There are numerous techniques called taikyoku (the word tai chi in Japanese) in different schools of Japanese sword and martial arts. All of them call more or less for the realization of the concept of Tai Chi in technical form, meaning the dynamic integration of the two complementary elements, yin and yang. All the original techniques were formed through this integration; it is the taikyoku. So the idea of Tai Chi is not exclusive to Tai Chi Chuan.

-3-

What does Tai Chi mean in physical terms? A simple example will help us to answer this question.
If you expand your chest (yin) horizontally, the opposite part of your body (your back, or yang part) becomes compressed. Conversely, if you compress your chest, your back expands. And you’ll find the same type of mobility if you compress and expand your trunk vertically, like an accordeon opening and closing up and down, or backwards and forwards. Your trunk expands and is compressed. You can also do this diagonally, on an angle. Such complementary movements of the trunk take place according to the principle of Tai Chi.
Imagine a wooden body like Pinocchio’s, whose whole trunk was made of a single block of wood and was incapable of flexible movement. Of course he could turn to the right and to the left, and tilt his body back and forth or up and down, but these were the only movements he could make.
Our bodies, on the other hand, have much greater mobility. If our register of movements appears limited, it is simply because of our way of seeing our body. We have to realize that we’ve imposed limitations on ourselves due to our way of thinking that it’s our arms and legs that must move, while our bodies need move only a little or not at all.
From the moment we decide that our arms and legs can move but that our body cannot, its potential mobility will systematically disappear from our awareness, leaving us with a wooden body just like Pinocchio’s. We imagine that we can’t move our trunk simply because we don’t know how to move it!
However, our trunk should indeed be able to move, but in a way that is different from the movement of our arms and legs. Moreover, it is capable of producing much more power than we are used to when working, for example, solely with our arms and our hands.
Long ago the ancient methods discovered the importance of hiding the body’s movements, and they also knew how to build and develop abilities well beyond the ordinary.
With a body like Pinocchio’s, we cannot train in Tai Chi Chuan, because only our arms, legs and neck will move, while the trunk remains stiff as a single block.
This is a crucial point which is often overlooked in today’s mass teaching. It could be one of the secrets of the effectiveness of Tai Chi Chuan which has never really been conveyed.

To be continued...

 

Articles - Essays by Kenji Tokitsu

La importancia del combate

There are no translations available.


La importancia del combate

por Kenji Tokitsu


Considero que mi nivel y modo de vivir dan constancia de la validez y corrección de mi método. A diario, experimento y examino una de las facetas de la eficacia a través del entrenamiento. Creo que en este arte hay que avanzar paso a paso, perfeccionando a través de la práctica. No hay etapa final. En todo caso, tengo más de 60 años y hoy hago mucho mejor el combate que hace 20 o 30 años y encuentro un gran placer en la práctica. Espero continuar mejorando incluso después de los 80 años. He superado una meta y hoy me baso en el dinamismo de una dimensión que ignoraba en mi juventud. Hoy corro bastante menos rápido que cuando tenía 20 años, pero técnicamente soy más veloz. La calidad de mis movimientos ha cambiado, lo que me permite imaginar lo que podré hacer dentro de 20 años o más.

Si te distancias del combate, es más fácil que caigas en el error de sentir que eres el mejor y el más fuerte del mundo.

Por ejemplo, cuando estudié el yi chuan en China, observé que pocas personas estaban dispuestas a hacer combate, ya que los encuentros resultaban violentos: se golpeaba sin control, directamente a la cara, sin protección. Y así forzosamente, había lesiones más o menos graves. Algunos dirán que es normal, ya que se trata del arte del combate y que hay que reforzar el espíritu y la disposición para la lucha. Pero es evidente que estas condiciones echan atrás a la mayoría de la gente. Los que se atreven a aventurarse son los que tienen una cierta confianza en sus capacidades. Desde el punto de vista de la formación en arte marcial, a esto lo llamo el “método salvaje” y considero que es poco aplicable en nuestra sociedad. Creo que en nuestra época, los que se lanzan a practicar el combate como si fuera una seria pelea callejera deben tener algún problema psíquico. Pero en cualquier caso, hacerlo así reduce radicalmente el número de practicantes del combate; por consiguiente entre la gran mayoría que practica el yi chuan y la pequeña minoría que practica el combate, hay una enorme diferencia de número.

 

En efecto la mayoría no se entrena en el combate –aunque la idea del combate serio y las hazañas de ciertos adeptos circulan por los grupos de esa escuela. Muchos son los que se identifican con esos “valientes”. En este tipo de ambiente, a menudo encontramos una cierta megalomanía y personas que tienen fuertes opiniones sobre la eficacia y el combate sin practicarlo nunca. Siempre tenemos que hacerle al ser humano el más fuerte del mundo. Entre la minoría que se entrena en el combate y la gran mayoría, la diferencia es tan grande que el combate tiende a convertirse más bien en un mito colectivo en esta escuela. Esto da lugar a una paradoja. La idea práctica del fundador de esta escuela es muy pragmática y realista, pero la mayoría no la sabe aplicar.

En cualquier caso, si el entrenamiento incluye el combate, dejamos las ilusiones y volvemos a la realidad, que no siempre resulta tan bella como desearíamos. Desde hace unos años hago ejercicios de combate con un casco de protección y guantes delgados que permiten también el agarre. Incluso utilizando protecciones hay que aprender a controlar los golpes y a afinar la calidad, porque la seguridad absoluta no existe en la práctica marcial. Podemos golpear a fondo, pero podemos también modificar el impacto del golpeo. Si lanzas de verdad los golpes, incluso sin golpear a fondo, esto cambiará muchas cosas. Se te derrumbarán las ilusiones y se harán evidentes tus insuficiencias técnicas y la fragilidad de tu percepción, hasta el punto de ver como ilusorias muchas de las técnicas que considerabas eficaces. La técnica y los movimientos que has construido en la cabeza se someten a prueba, y muchos se revelarán como poco realistas, por lo que tendrás que reexaminarlos. Esto es lo interesante.

He hecho muchos descubrimientos estos últimos años, en particular en cuanto a la relación directa entre el combate y los ejercicios de yi chuan, de taichi y de qi gong. El combate se hace consistente y agradable, puedes transpirar desde el fondo del cuerpo; creo que es una cosa importante sea cual sea la edad, porque vivimos con un cuerpo que está hecho para la actividad. He entrenado en el combate desde siempre, pero para mí esta forma ha resultado ser la más satisfactoria; es interesante y hasta divertida. La mayoría de mis alumnos la aprecia también.

 

Articles - Jisei budo

Kenji Tokitsu y el Budo

There are no translations available.

Kenji Tokitsu y el Budo

Entrevista concedida por Kenji Tokitsu sensei a la revista francesa "Arts Martiaux".



Tenemos ante nosotros varios números de revistas japonesas de budo y de karate. Aparece en la portada de algunos números y dirige algunos apartados técnicos. ¿Cuál es su actividad en Japón?

Tengo una doble actividad en Japón. Por una parte, la enseñanza y la investigación sobre las artes marciales; por otra parte, un proyecto de actividad de educación social. Me explico. Desde hace algunos años, solicitado por el dojo de mi antigua universidad y por algunos grupos de karatekas, voy cada año a Japón para enseñar allí karate y arte marcial chino. Las dos principales revistas de artes marciales han tomado contacto conmigo. En la revista "Karate do" he escrito sobre la teoría del budo durante tres años, y en la revista "Budo" editada por el Nipón-Budokan, sobre los problemas del budo bajo una perspectiva planetaria. Mis artículos han tenido mucho eco y estos textos van a ser publicados en forma de libro este año.

Mi otra actividad no es por el momento más que un proyecto. No se trata de artes marciales. Muchas personas me han presentado proyectos de acción social, cultural y educativa en Japón.

Hablemos entonces de artes marciales. ¿Usted ha escrito sobre el método a partir de su práctica y de sus reflexiones?

Ya he explicado porqué he sido llevado a plantearme ciertas cuestiones. No ha sido por el placer de interrogarme , sino por practicar bien. He afrontado en el curso de mi práctica, diferentes problemas que me he esforzado en resolver. Así es como he avanzado.

Su trayectoria es entonces empírica desde el principio. . .

Por supuesto. Lo es la práctica ante todo. Practicaba muy seriamente el karate Shotokan y tropecé con problemas sobre las técnicas, los katas, la manera de practicar. . . Estos interrogantes me condujeron a investigaciones sobre otros estilos y escuelas de karate.

Sitúo los problemas del karate a nivel global, no de un estilo o de una escuela, porque la superficie de la isla de Okinawa, trozo del karate, es la mitad de la de la isla de la Reunión, una séptima de la de Córcega. Sobre esta pequeña isla no podían existir diferencias en el modo de vida. Las paredes de los estilos y de las escuelas del karate actual son una creación contemporánea, debido principalmente a problemas de organización relacionados con la economía y la política. Entonces, si queréis acceder a la auténtica calidad del karate es necesario superar estas barreras.

Tenéis que hacer frente al karate en sí, no al karate institucionalizado. Es lo que yo intento hacer , ya que quiero conocer lo que existió verdaderamente y aproximarme a la verdad histórica para aprender el método lo mejor posible. Naturalmente, esta trayectoria me ha conducido a las artes marciales chinas, lo cual es normal puesto que históricamente el karate de Okinawa nació de algunas ramas de la corriente de Shaolin-quan. En Francia, las artes marciales chinas están vinculadas a la Federación de karate, pero históricamente es el karate el que está vinculado a las artes marciales chinas.

¿Usted ha estudiado diferentes disciplinas de artes marciales chinas?

He estudiado todas las disciplinas que he podido encontrar, pero hay que precisar bien. Estudiar y practicar son dos cosas diferentes. He encontrado muchas personas que enseñaban las artes marciales chinas. Los encuentros han sido todos muy beneficiosos porque siempre hay mucho que aprender de la simple observación de su práctica. Cuando fui invitado a hacerlo practiqué con ellos. Así he leído diferentes documentos en el marco de mis estudios. De este modo, he estudiado muchas disciplinas paralelamente a mi propia práctica. Pienso que para profundizar verdaderamente en un arte marcial hay que extender sus conocimientos. Es importante conocer las particularidades de las otras disciplinas porque desde el punto de vista marcial sus practicantes pueden ser vuestros adversarios y también porque las particularidades de los otros pueden daros una visión técnica diferente. Como dice un proverbio japonés: la rana de un pozo no podrá jamás soñar con un gran océano. Si uno se queda en su visión mezquina del mundo se arriesga a atrasarse en combate. Esto es lo que yo he comprendido saliendo de un solo estilo y de una escuela de karate.

¿Lo ha escrito usted en su libro?

Si. Pensé que la reflexión basada sobre la experiencia sería más fácil de comprender porque mi itinerario era una búsqueda del método. A comienzos de los años 80 reencontré al Maestro. Nishino y estudié su método de respiración. El M. Nishino era alumno del M. Sawai, fundador del taiki-ken. Entonces estudié también el taiki-ken. Me sumergí en la práctica de estas dos disciplinas estudiando siempre el taichi chuan y continuando en todo momento con el karate. En esta época consagré a la práctica de las artes marciales casi la totalidad de mis días.

En 1990 reencontré al M. Yu que me presentó a diferentes maestros de yi chuan en Pekín. El reencuentro es una cosa extraña y apasionante en la vida y también en la vía de la investigación. El yi chuan es el origen del taiki-ken. Pude establecer entonces la comparación entre los dos y elaboré naturalmente una síntesis que continúo practicando. Al ejercicio de pie inmóvil continúo llamándole ritsu-zen en lugar de zhan zhuang porque comencé con este término y también porque el sentido de este término me convence más. Este ejercicio no es propio del yi chuan. Se practica en otras artes marciales chinas. Existe un ejercicio equivalente en el sable japonés.

He presentado y analizado el método del yi chuan y el del taichi chuan. Mi análisis se basa sobre mis experiencias:las enseñanzas de diferentes maestros, las lecturas de diversos textos y sobretodo, mi propia práctica.

Mis artículos en Japón han sido diversamente apreciados. La mayor parte de las apreciaciones han sido muy positivas. Algunos me criticaron porque de alguna manera osé escribir sobre el taiki-ken, sobre el yi chuan y sobre el taichi chuan sin utilizar la lengua oficial de la disciplina, sin pertenecer a un grupo oficial y sin que practicara exclusivamente el karate, el taiki-ken, el yi chuan o el taichi chuan.

He respondido a estas críticas respecto a que mi práctica no pertenecía al marco de ninguna disciplina. Yo no pertenezco ni al karate ni al taiki-ken, ni al yi chuan ni al taichi chuan. He practicado intensamente cada uno de estos métodos `pero ninguno me ha parecido plenamente satisfactorio. Son importantes y continúo practicándolos, pero no de manera exclusiva. He construido una síntesis de ellos. Prosigo mi investigación sobre el método de artes marciales investigando y elaborando la mejor práctica para mi. Guardaré y defenderé mi libertad de poder relativizar los diferentes métodos que estudio y practico.

Por ejemplo, consagro alrededor de dos horas diarias a mi práctica del yi chuan, pero no digo que soy un practicante de yi chuan porque me ejercito también en el taichi, en el karate y en el sable. . . Ahora bien, las personas que se ejercitan menos que yo, se dicen practicantes del Yi chuan porque no practican otra cosa y afirman por consecuente que sus discursos son más justos. Algunos karatekas dicen que que yo no soy un karateka porque practico el Yi chuan, el taichi. . . Esto me hace reir y me da exactamente igual. En todo caso, de esta manera he ido precisando poco a poco la posición a partir de la cual expongo mis cuestiones y reflexiones.

¿Pero para el examen del método tiene usted criterios objetivos?

Mis criterios son simples y claros. Practico un arte marcial a manos vacías, principalmente un arte de combate de percusión. Es mi punto de partida. El método debe asegurar una eficacia. Pero ¿eficacia en qué?. ¡La eficacia en combate, por supuesto!, pero no el combate en general. Si habláis del combate a secas entraréis rapidamente en un callejón sin salida. Mi arte del combate es el de la percusión. Incluso si se ha extendido a las técnicas de prensión, el eje central de mi arte es el de la percusión.

La eficacia tiene dos vertientes;inmediata y a largo plazo. Es necesario que la técnica que se ejecute sea aplicable y eficaz rapidamente. Se debe obtener una capacidad técnica en algunos años, uno o dos. Pero la capacidad técnica debe aumentar y desarrollarse mucho más a lo largo del tiempo. Si alguien muy fuerte a los 20 o 30 años se hace menos eficaz después de los 40 años y su capacidad disminuye de año en año, hay que reconocer que la segunda vertiente no funciona. Juzgo entonces que el método no es bueno. Sobre este punto, el método actual del karate plantea problemas. La búsqueda de la eficacia implica entonces, si tomamos en consideración la duración, la del bienestar y la de la buena salud.

Así pues, un buen método de arte marcial debe asegurar una técnica eficaz y un principio de energía, base de la longevidad.

¿Cómo se puede constatar la realización de estas dos vertientes de la eficacia?

Por mi parte, solo tengo que probar la exactitud de mi método conmigo mismo. Experimento y examino cotidianamente la primera vertiente de la eficacia a través del ejercicio de combate. Pienso que en el arte de combate hay que avanzar paso a paso colocando los péndulos de la hora a través del ejercicio de combate. En todo caso, tengo 52 años y estoy mejor hoy en combate libre que hace 10 o 20 años y amo verdaderamente los ejercicios de combate. Tengo por perspectiva continuar mejorando en combate incluso hasta después de mis 70 años. Si uno se aleja del combate fortalece una sensación errónea y se arriesga a pensar que es el mejor y el más fuerte del mundo. Haciendo combate las ilusiones se derrumban y uno es consciente de la realidad, que no siempre es tan bella como uno imagina. Desde hace algunos años hago ejercicios de combate con una máscara de protección y guantes finos que me permiten efectuar agarres. Incluso utilizando protecciones controlamos, pero si se hace un combate donde déis verdaderamente golpes incluso sin golpear a fondo, cambiará mucho las cosas. Esto hace derrumbarse las ilusiones. La técnica y los movimientos que habéis construido en vuestra cabeza se someten a prueba. La mayor parte se verifica como irreal y sois llevados a reexaminaros. Esto es lo interesante. He hecho muchos descubrimientos estos últimos años, en particular en lo que concierne a la relación directa del combate con los ejercicios de yi chuan, de taichi y de qi gong. El combate se hace muy consistente y de alguna manera, placentero;podéis transpirar desde el fondo de vuestro cuerpo. Siempre he hecho mucho combate, pero esta forma se ha revelado como la más satisfactoria para mi. Es verdaderamente interesante y al mismo tiempo divertida. La mayor parte de mis alumnos la aprecian también.

¿Qué es lo que realmente enseña usted?

Yo enseño principalmente el taichi de combate, donde condenso mi experiencia y mis conocimientos del karate y de otras artes marciales que he practicado. Con los ejercicios de taichi he dado a mis alumnos la posibilidad de un trabajo a la vez energético y técnico.

Su trayectoria es entonces empírica desde el principio. . .

Por supuesto. Lo es la práctica ante todo. Practicaba muy seriamente el karate Shotokan y tropecé con problemas sobre las técnicas, los katas, la manera de practicar. . . Estos interrogantes me condujeron a investigaciones sobre otros estilos y escuelas de karate.

Sitúo los problemas del karate a nivel global, no de un estilo o de una escuela, porque la superficie de la isla de Okinawa, trozo del karate, es la mitad de la de la isla de la Reunión, una séptima de la de Córcega. Sobre esta pequeña isla no podían existir diferencias en el modo de vida. Las paredes de los estilos y de las escuelas del karate actual son una creación contemporánea, debido principalmente a problemas de organización relacionados con la economía y la política. Entonces, si queréis acceder a la auténtica calidad del karate es necesario superar estas barreras.

Tenéis que hacer frente al karate en sí, no al karate institucionalizado. Es lo que yo intento hacer , ya que quiero conocer lo que existió verdaderamente y aproximarme a la verdad histórica para aprender el método lo mejor posible. Naturalmente, esta trayectoria me ha conducido a las artes marciales chinas, lo cual es normal puesto que históricamente el karate de Okinawa nació de algunas ramas de la corriente de Shaolin-quan. En Francia, las artes marciales chinas están vinculadas a la Federación de karate, pero históricamente es el karate el que está vinculado a las artes marciales chinas.



¿Usted ha estudiado diferentes disciplinas de artes marciales chinas?

He estudiado todas las disciplinas que he podido encontrar, pero hay que precisar bien. Estudiar y practicar son dos cosas diferentes. He encontrado muchas personas que enseñaban las artes marciales chinas. Los encuentros han sido todos muy beneficiosos porque siempre hay mucho que aprender de la simple observación de su práctica. Cuando fui invitado a hacerlo practiqué con ellos. Así he leído diferentes documentos en el marco de mis estudios. De este modo, he estudiado muchas disciplinas paralelamente a mi propia práctica. Pienso que para profundizar verdaderamente en un arte marcial hay que extender sus conocimientos. Es importante conocer las particularidades de las otras disciplinas porque desde el punto de vista marcial sus practicantes pueden ser vuestros adversarios y también porque las particularidades de los otros pueden daros una visión técnica diferente. Como dice un proverbio japonés: la rana de un pozo no podrá jamás soñar con un gran océano. Si uno se queda en su visión mezquina del mundo se arriesga a atrasarse en combate. Esto es lo que yo he comprendido saliendo de un solo estilo y de una escuela de karate.


 

Articles - Interviews

More Articles...

Page 3 of 5

3

links

Interesting websites

Rincon del do
Artículos sobre artes marciales en general

Hispagimnasios.com
Best spanish speaking martial arts forum

http://www.tokitsuryu.org
Kenji Tokitsu's official website

http://www.tokitsuryu.com
Tokitsu-ryu Portugal

http://www.dojolello.com
Dojo Lello. Tokitsu-ryu Suiza

Latest news

Prev Next

Curso en Laredo. 26 de enero

Curso en Laredo. 26 de enero

Curso-Clase Jiseido Tokitsu Ryu Cantabria ¡Todos los niveles! Sábado 26 de Enero.   Imparte: Oskar GutiérrezLugar: Gimnasio: Colegio Pablo PicassoDirección: Avd. de los Derechos Humanos, 0, 39770 Laredo (Cantabria)Horario: 10:00 a 13:00 h Tema: Principios...

09 Jan 2013

Nueva tienda EOBShop

Nueva tienda EOBShop

Nueva tienda en internet para adquirir material de jiseido.: ropa de entrenamiento, keikogis, protecciones, material audiovisual http://www.eobshop.com

27 Dec 2012

Videos Jiseido en sapeando.com

Videos Jiseido en sapeando.com

Nuevos videos didácticos sobre Jiseido en la página sapeando.com  

05 Dec 2012

Actividades cuarto trimestre

Actividades cuarto trimestre

Calendario de eventos cuarto trimestre Fecha Evento/ clase / curso Lugar 20/10/2012 Jisei Kikô y Jisei Tai chi / Todos los niveles Jisei Budo BILBAO 20/10/2012 Asamblea General BILBAO 17/11/212 EXAMEN DE GRADO BILBAO 17/11/2012 Jisei Kikô y Jisei Tai chi - Jisei Budo...

25 Oct 2012

Curso Tokitsu-ryu 20 Ocutubre

SABADO 20 DE OCTUBREESPACIO ORIENTAL BILBAOAvenida de Ramón y Cajal, nº 39 3º dcha. – Deusto, BilbaoImparte: Maestro Oscar Gutierrez, 6º Dan de la Escuela Internacional Tokitsu Ryu y...

08 Oct 2012

22 Septiembre. Clase presentación en Mad…

22 Septiembre. Clase presentación en Madrid

CLASE PRESENTACION TOKITSU RYU EN MAJADAHONDA (MADRID) El sábado 22 de septiembre de 11:00 a 13:00 se presentara la Escuela Tokitsu Ryu en el Centro Yoga Space (C/ Gran...

18 Sep 2012

15 Septiembre. Clase abierta

15 Septiembre. Clase abierta

Clase-Curso abierta para tod@s. Revisión del trabajo realizado en Barcelona. Shoshuten parcial y trabajo de taté uke   15 de septiembre Espacio Oriental Bilbao Precio:    25 € Horario: de 10:00 h a 12:30 h Información...

12 Sep 2012

Karate Jiseido. Clases infantiles

Karate Jiseido. Clases infantiles

Clases infantiles Jiseido Karate-do Espacio Oriental Bilbao.Dojo Central Tokitsu-ryu c/ Ramón y Cajal nº 39 Deusto, BILBAO Metro parada Deusto Lunes y Miércoles de 18:00 a 19:00Precio 27€. comienzo: 1 de Octubre, Lunes Más información...

04 Sep 2012

Seminarios temporada 2012-2013

Seminarios temporada 2012-2013

Clases y seminarios privados con Oscar Gutiérrez sensei. Esta temporada se ofrecerá la posibilidad de realizar clases o seminarios privados con Oscar Gutierrez sensei coincidiendo con los cursos mensuales que se...

03 Sep 2012

Nueva temporada 20012-2013

Nueva temporada 20012-2013

  Clases en el Dojo Central Las clases de tai chi, kikô, budo en el Dojo central Tokitsu-ryu darán comienzo el lunes 3 de Septiembre.HORARIOS.Lunes  y   miércoles19:30 -21:00 h            Tai chi -...

03 Sep 2012

Videos Kenji Tokitsu

Videos Kenji Tokitsu

Durante el fin de semana Tokitsu Sensei realizara unos nuevos videos, que serán lanzados en agosto. SAPEANDO.COM será la encargada del trabajo tanto en la producción como en la difusión. Estamos...

14 Jul 2012

Crónica del curso en Barcelona 30 Junio …

Crónica del curso en Barcelona 30 Junio 2012

Curso en Barcelona 30 Junio 2012 El pasado fin de semana en el  Polideportivo de Santa Coloma de Gramenet –Barcelona,  Sonya Suances, Oscar Gutiérrez y Ricardo López este ultimo profesor de...

04 Jul 2012

X Encuentro de Tai Chi Chuan de Madrid

X Encuentro de Tai Chi Chuan de Madrid Con motivo de la celebración del X Encuentro de Tai Chi Chuan de Madrid, se realizo el sábado un taller gratuito y abierto...

26 Jun 2012

Área privada. Nuevos contenidos

Área privada. Nuevos contenidos

Los contenidos del área privada continúan ampliándose Se está dando prioridad a contenidos técnicos que sirvan de referencia para la práctica personal: recientemente, por ejemplo, hemos publicado material sobre el trabajo...

12 Apr 2012

Clases para mayores

Clases para mayores

 

21 Jan 2012

Jisei Kiko (qigong) video lessons

Jisei Kiko (qigong) video lessons

Oskar Gutierrez y Sonya Suances are publishing introductory lessons of the Yayama Method on the SAPEAND O.COM website.   You can see them and comment by clicking on the following link:   http://www.sapeando.com/?p=819  

28 Sep 2011

Classes for kids

Classes for Kids in the Espacio Oriental Bilbao In the coming season we will be offering in the Espacio Oriental Bilbao classes designed for children. Groups are now being formed, so...

15 Jul 2011